Assault, Battery, And Aggravated Assault: What's The Difference?

Posted on: 19 September 2019

If you've been charged with a crime, one of the best ways you can help yourself is by carefully understanding the charges against you and what they potentially mean. Doing so gives you the ability to make educated decisions about your case and to better assist your attorney in your own defense. Assault, battery, and aggravated assault all sound similar and they all involve an intentional act of violence toward another person -- but they're distinctly different charges with different potential penalties.
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Mistakes That Aggravate During DUI Stops

Posted on: 22 May 2019

Your behavior during a DUI (driving under the influence) stop determines many things. Here are some behaviors that may worsen your situation during a DUI stop. Making Incriminating Statements One of the worst things you can do at a DUI stop is to admit to the police that you have been drinking. It doesn't matter whether you say you have taken "just a sip" of alcohol. The moment you admit to drinking, you have already incriminated yourself, and the police are unlikely to let you go.
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A Look At Common Terminology Used In Drug Offense Cases

Posted on: 7 January 2019

According to DrugWarFacts.org, law enforcement made 1,632,921 in the year 2017 for drug-related offenses. The never-ending war on drugs brings about a lot of new arrests by the day, and unfortunately, if you have anything to do with illegal substances, you could be one of the people charged with a drug offense. Because drug offenses are taken so seriously, your best line of defense is to hire a good drug offense lawyer and arm yourself with knowledge.
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Seeking Alternative Treatment After An Injury? Here Are Some Details To Demonstrate

Posted on: 26 October 2018

In a personal injury law case, the defendant's attorneys will heavily scrutinize the path that you've taken and continue to take in the treatment of your injury. If there's an opportunity for them to suggest that you've taken the wrong course of action, they'll be quick to attempt to get the case dismissed — or, at the very least, argue that their client shouldn't give you the settlement that you're asking for.
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